The struggle against the Ship Tax continued in the House of Commons. Please could you let us know your source of information. But the judges had been deeply divided and public opinion stood by Hampden. The most far-reaching of these financial manoeuvres was Ship-money. Ship money, in British history, a nonparliamentary tax first levied in medieval times by the English crown on coastal cities and counties for naval defense in time of war. Many Puritans wore their hair closely cropped in obvious contrast to the long ringlets fashionable at the court of Charles I. Roundhead appears to have been first used as a term of derision toward the…. King Charles I and Parliament could not and would not work together. [1], The issue of a third writ of ship money on 9 October 1636 made it evident that the ancient restrictions that limited the levying of the tax to the maritime parts of the Kingdom and to times of war (or imminent national danger) had been finally swept away, and that the King intended to convert it into a permanent and general form of taxation without parliamentary sanction.

Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students. This was the first occasion when the demand for ship-money aroused serious opposition, in view of the declaration in the petition that

Hampden resisted on principle the payment of ship money, a levy collected by the king for outfitting his navy. This was the first occasion when the demand for ship-money aroused serious opposition,[1] in view of the declaration in the petition that. Do you have specialist knowledge or a particular interest about any aspect of the portrait or sitter or artist that you can share with us? John Hampden (c. 1595 – 1643) was an English politician, the eldest son of William Hampden, of Hampden House, Great Hampden in Buckinghamshire, a descendant of a very ancient family of that county, said to have been established there before the Norman conquest, and of Elizabeth, second daughter of Sir Henry Cromwell, and aunt of Oliver Cromwell. Sitter associated with 17 portraitsOne of the central figures at the start of the English Revolution. During this period Cromwell developed a local reputation among those opposed to Charles's government. In 1637 he was convicted of refusing to pay Ship Money, a tax introduced by Charles I. In 1640 the Long Parliament set aside the decision of the court. The Plantagenet kings of England had exercised the right of requiring the maritime towns and counties to furnish ships in time of war, and this duty was sometimes commuted for a money payment. (10), Puritans and many other strongly committed Protestants were convinced that Archbishop William Laud and Thomas Wentworth, the Earl of Strafford, were the main figures behind this conspiracy.

John Hampden (c. 1595 – 1643) was an English politician, the eldest son of William Hampden, of Hampden House, Great Hampden in Buckinghamshire, a descendant of a very ancient family of that county, said to have been established there before the Norman conquest, and of Elizabeth, second daughter of Sir Henry Cromwell, and aunt of Oliver Cromwell. You can read more detail in our cookie policy to help you decide. The king is pleased to give way to those subjects that refuses to pay, whereof Mr. John Hampden is one, to have their counsel to argue the case in point of law in the exchequer chamber before all the judges, and Mr. St John hath already argued for the subject very boldly and bravely. I know not. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. Charles, no longer receiving money from Parliament, in 1635 extended the Ship Money tax to include inland towns and counties. He was known for his anti-Catholic views and saw Parliament's role as safeguarding England against the influence of the Pope: "The high court of Parliament is the great eye of the kingdom, to find out offences and punish them". (5), In November, Hampden was prosecuted for refusing to pay the Ship Money on his lands in Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire. Cromwell agreed and said he was "a great stickler" against the tax. Many people were alarmed at the judges’ decision, for it implied that, in times of emergency, the King could demand money for the defence of the realm without parliamentary consent. He came from an ancient Buckinghamshire family with a long tradition of service to the Crown, but he became known as ‘Patriae Pater – The Father of the People’ when he stood out against the imposition of the Ship Money tax. Hampden was included in the list of five Long Parliament leaders whom Charles I ordered arrested in January 1642 on the charge of high treason, but popular protest thwarted implementation of the order. Hampden sat as MP for Grampound, Cornwall in the Parliament of 1621 during the reign of James I, then as MP for Wendover, Buckinghamshire, in the first three Parliaments of the reign of Charles I.

This time he extended the levy to inland counties as well, on the grounds that "the charge of defence which concerneth all men ought to be supported by all." [1], In 1634, Charles made a secret treaty with Philip IV of Spain to assist him against the Dutch. The judges voted seven against five in favour of conviction but the publicity surrounding the case made Hampton one of the most popular men in England.

Charles, no longer receiving money from Parliament, in 1635 extended the