However, one villager, the mysterious Swinda, lures Albrun into an uneasy friendship, tempting her with sensual delights. The local church contains an ossuary, its walls lined with skulls and other bones.

Albrun is left alone to tend to her mother, whose physical and mental condition deteriorates rapidly, culminating in a sexual assault against her daughter.

As an adult, she is a single mother and a marked woman, outcast by a society twisted in deep-rooted superstitions and misogyny. Hagazussa: A Heathen's Curse is a 2017 horror film written and directed by Lukas Feigelfeld in his feature directorial debut, and produced by Feigelfeld and Simon Lubinski. When a visiting Swinda notices it, she promptly leaves. The film takes place in a remote mountain village in the 15th-century Alps, and follows Aleksandra Cwen as Albrun, a goat-herder shunned by her fellow townspeople who finds herself in an uneasy friendship with a local villager.

", "Hagazussa: A Heathen's Curse (Hagazussa) (2018) – Rotten Tomatoes", "Critic Reviews for Hagazussa - Metacritic", "Fantastic Fest Review: HAGAZUSSA - A HEATHEN'S CURSE Is A Nightmarish Slow Burn", "Review: The medieval horror of 'Hagazussa' unsettles as it beguiles", "Hagazussa Movie Review & Film Summary (2019)", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hagazussa&oldid=974838229, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 25 August 2020, at 09:17. In 15th century Austria, a cold winter lies heavy upon the Alps, while superstition reigns unquestioned over the local peasantry. Cast: Aleksandra Cwen, Celina Peter, Claudia Martini, AKA: Hagazussa / Hagazussa: Der Hexenfluch, Limited Edition Blu-ray and Soundtrack CD collection (2000 copies), Original DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 surround and LPCM Stereo 2.0 Audio, Reversible sleeve featuring artwork by Adrian Baxter, Booklet featuring new writing on the film by Kier-La Janisse and press book extracts, illustrated with original stills, Double-sided fold-out poster featuring two artworks, Slipcover featuring original artwork by Adrian Baxter, Audio commentary by critic and author Kat Ellinger, Select scene audio commentary by writer-director Lukas Feigelfeld, Beton [Concrete] (2013, 55 mins) and Interferenz (2013, 48 mins), two short films by Lukas Feigelfeld, Deleted scene with optional commentary by Feigelfeld, CD containing the complete Hagazussa Soundtrack by MMMD. "[3], The music for the film was composed by Greek dark ambient duo MMMD. Titanic (1979) Blu-ray: A realistic account of events, Nathalie: Escape from Hell (1978) – Nazisploitation Blu-ray. They are both picturesque films set in a bygone era in pastoral settings. Later, when Albrun comes to town while holding her child, she sees many dead bodies being transported away.

Paranoia & Superstition in 15th Century Europe. FIRE: In her cabin, as Albrun sleeps, a snake travels over her body.

They walk to town together. A Review of Hagazussa.

Albrun takes her mother's skull and places it in a corner of her cottage. She surrounds it with flowers and a candle. Copyright © 2020 Kult Cinema. As well as to understand what utterly evil things people were led to do while suffering from psychosis in the Middle Ages and being surrounded by superstition and religious prosecution. Later, the mother takes ill and is visited by a doctor and nun from a nearby town. The strange sounds continue as she masturbates. The film, an international co-production between Germany and Austria, premiered at Fantastic Fest i [1][2] According to Feigelfeld: "After researching about old pagan beliefs and folklore about witches, that were supposed to roam the mountain woods in those times, my interest was to develop a character that these folk tales would have branded as a witch, but to dig deeper into her psyche and see her as the traumatized, mistreated and finally delusional person that society constructed. Feigelfeld wrote, directed, and co-produced Hagazussa as his film school graduation project, partially financing it with crowdfunding donations.

[8] Brad Miska of Bloody Disgusting wrote that "Hagazussa is Germany's answer to The Witch that has stunning atmosphere mixed with brooding terror from start to finish".